Programme

This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Thursday, July 07, 2022Friday, July 08, 2022Saturday, July 09, 2022Sunday, July 10, 2022

13:00-13:30: Conference Registration

13:30-13:45: Announcements & Welcome Address

13:45-14:45: Keynote Presentation

14:45-15:15: Coffee Break

15:15-16:00: Featured Panel Presentation

16:15-16:30: Short Break

16:30-17:15: Featured Panel Presentation

17:15-17:30: Conference Photograph

17:30-18:30: Conference Poster Session & Welcome Reception

10:30-12:00: On-site Keynote Presentation

12:00-13:00: Lunch Break

13:00-14:40: On-site Parallel Session 1

14:40-14:55: Coffee Break

14:55-16:35: On-site Parallel Session 2

16:35-16:50: Coffee Break

16:50-18:30: On-site Parallel Session 3

10:30-12:00: On-site Keynote Presentation

12:00-13:00: Lunch Break

13:00-14:40: On-site Parallel Session 1

14:40-14:55: Coffee Break

14:55-16:35: On-site Parallel Session 2

16:35-17:00: On-site Closing Session

09:00-10:40: Live-Stream Presentation Session 1 | Online

10:40-10:50: Break

10:50-12:30: Live-Stream Presentation Session 2 | Online

12:30-12:40: Break

12:40-14:20: Live-Stream Presentation Session 3 | Online

14:20-14:30: Break

14:30-15:45: Live-Stream Presentation Session 4 | Online

15:45-16:00: Online Conference Closing Session

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on June 06, 2022. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Presentations

  • Viability and Sustainability of Creative Practices, Crafts and Traditional Industry Sectors
    Viability and Sustainability of Creative Practices, Crafts and Traditional Industry Sectors
    Keynote Presentation: Lynn-Sayers McHattie
  • The Attention Economy
    The Attention Economy
    Keynote Presentation: Jon Wozencroft
  • Experiential Knowledge + Science + Art = Creative Ethnographic Drawing
    Experiential Knowledge + Science + Art = Creative Ethnographic Drawing
    Keynote Presentation: Susana de Noronha
  • Beyond a Dialogue between the Sciences and the Arts in Times of Uncertainty
    Beyond a Dialogue between the Sciences and the Arts in Times of Uncertainty
    Keynote Presentation: Manuel Heitor
  • Design and Technology in Online Spaces: Health, Work, Education and the Future
    Design and Technology in Online Spaces: Health, Work, Education and the Future
    Keynote Presentation: Michael Menchaca
  • Against the Method: Recovering the Senses in the Age of Hyperformatting
    Against the Method: Recovering the Senses in the Age of Hyperformatting
    Keynote Presentation: Mirian Nogueira Tavares

Conference Programme

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on June 06, 2022. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.

Viability and Sustainability of Creative Practices, Crafts and Traditional Industry Sectors
Keynote Presentation: Lynn-Sayers McHattie

Contemporary practices of craft are increasingly associated with progressive agendas of gender emancipation, environmental sustainability and locally rooted ethical production and consumption. This presentation explores the ‘political economy of craft’ as an embodied and experiential practice, towards situating craft as a rich form of cultural wisdom. The research focuses on Fair Isle and Sanquhar knitting as a body of knowledges and practices - viewed as a form of material cultural assets - which can support the future sustainability of craft practitioners, in distributed geographical contexts. In so doing cultural assets yield an emotional and intellectual approach that literally unpicks the political economy of craft exposing its relations to production whilst at the same time binding the interdependencies between innovation and tradition that contribute to the cultural life of communities.

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The Attention Economy
Keynote Presentation: Jon Wozencroft

The attention economy was first theorised by political scientist Herbert A. Simon in 1971, sensing that the tendency towards information overload would create paralysis. “What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients”, he wrote. “Attention transactions" would replace financial transactions as the focus of our economic system, and especially in the worlds of politics, advertising and social media, so it came to be.

Intangible factors became paramount to the processes of promotion and distribution, namely immediacy, personalisation and free accessibility. "Attention economics" forms a potential consumer's attention as a resource – advertisers follow a model they called AIDA - Attention, Interest, Desire and Action. Attention is therefore the first stage in the process of converting non-believers and non-consumers. There is no time to digest, only to react, or not.

Progressively this directive takes over all aspects of communication, bringing us to the current conditions of widespread disinformation and its supposed remedy, the digital detox. If “ignorance is bliss”, in its latest guise, ignorance becomes essential for maintaining a certain level of mental health.

Disinformation fosters conspiracy theories, anxiety, incredulity, with the dangerous outcome that nobody believes anything anymore, or could that be the opposite?... Extremism emerges as the only way of attracting attention.

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Experiential Knowledge + Science + Art = Creative Ethnographic Drawing
Keynote Presentation: Susana de Noronha

Can a new format of illustrated social science, combining text and image, using visual and creative methodologies, facilitate and reinforce the outcomes and impact of our research in matters of health and illness? This presentation describes the outline and the heuristic possibilities of a novel qualitative methodology – creative ethnographic drawing – a hybrid approach I’ve been developing for the past five years. This transdisciplinary methodology evolved from a postdoctoral anthropological investigation focusing on the stories of Portuguese women with diverse cancer experiences, analysing how illness, resistance and death were experienced and conceptualised. With a view to a reinforced understanding of cancer, it underlines the experiential knowledge of those who live and feel it, patients, survivors, and bereaved relatives, bringing to the discussion whatever was regarded as relevant from their point of view. Combining firsthand experience and social science, enhanced by art, this methodology integrates embodied reasoning, speech, and drawing in the core of the investigation, using them as methodological resources and forms of knowledge, using my interlocutors’ words and stories to create a meaningful sequence of images.

With the potential to democratise science, producing a more accessible, readable and visible form of knowledge, creative visual methodologies can also broaden the way social studies understand reality and take action, diversifying what we can say, show, and do. Refusing their accessory or secondary participation in science, I use the ontological, heuristic, epistemological, and performative resources offered by artistic and visual practices, considering them as possible extensions of experience, that is, a part of the way illness can be felt, understood, and managed. Linking medical anthropology to the possibilities of a hybridization of ethnography, art, and visual methods, I emphasise what we can find in that combination. Methodologically, however, the drawings and paintings go beyond what is conventionally understood as scientific illustration. By adding metaphor and imagination to the creative process, with the use of specific shapes and colours, I was able to materialise ideas and facts that otherwise would not be translatable into conventional realistic illustration, aiming to broaden and facilitate the reader’s and viewer’s comprehension.

Resulting from informal conversations, the drawings are understood as collaborative and co-authored creations, bearing the names or pseudonyms of my interlocutors, seeking a balance between writing and speaking, reaffirming the undivided roles of the researcher and the interviewees in their conceptual formulation.

Image: Noronha, Susana (2016) These are my rings: me, my mother and my sister (Acrylic on paper)

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Beyond a Dialogue between the Sciences and the Arts in Times of Uncertainty
Keynote Presentation: Manuel Heitor

Understanding “Human Agency” and the Need to Guarantee Responsible, People-centred and Climate-aware Systems for our Common Good in a Decentralised and AI Driven Digital Age

This lecture relies on the hypothesis that current challenges associated with increasing uncertainties of modern western societies must lead us to safer, cleaner and more resilient forms of digital governance and forms of institutional innovation that must necessarily be centred on people but, above all, be oriented through our collective knowledge. Recent unexpected threats to our common safety and public goods, including public health, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the increasing activity of individual digital terrorism or the Russian invasion of Ukraine, have shown that our societies are not as safe as we thought. In association with other recent political decisions and movements, such as Brexit among many other nationalistic movements and trends, we are facing unprecedented threats that should foster a clear call for action.

Evolving forms of technology governance, including the regulation of digital platforms and digital standards, should be oriented to promote “digital humanism” and guarantee a transdisciplinary approach to collective behaviours and the consideration of “human agency”. They should ensure that citizens, at large, have better knowledge of digital services and digital providers, together with improved user responsibility in an emerging decentralised digital age and AI-enabled innovations. Although most of the current debate is dominated by new technological advancements of products and services in the financial industry (i.e., Fintech), as well as related issues associated with blockchain in the context of cryptocurrencies, the acceleration of decentralisation and AI affects a quite diversified set of actors and sectors of activity and all of our daily life, from industry and critical infrastructures to the arts (e.g., NFTs, non-fungible tokens).

We focus this lecture on the need to guarantee our collective responsibility towards carbon neutrality, avoiding a climate disaster, as well as promoting our global safety. This requires new research on emerging forms of knowledge production and diffusion, together with the need to understand “collective behaviours” through new transdisciplinary approaches, moving beyond a dialogue between the sciences and the arts. Above all, these issues should contribute definitely to technology governance of decentralised digital networks and an increasingly massified use of AI.

A few case studies are provided, including sustainable land management for carbon neutrality, the preservation of coastal areas and the protection of space assets in the era of “New Space”.

Empowering users and citizens, at large, will promote the need to educate and train every single citizen, while ultimately avoiding dominant economic or political interests, as well as digital terrorism and related individual malfunctions. The rules of governance must boost research and innovation, foster growth and competitiveness and help smaller companies and start-ups to compete with very large players, in particular those who have the ability to copy their features, acquire them or block their business. New governance models must facilitate access and use of data by consumers, while providing incentives for them to invest in ways to generate value through data in association with “human agency”. It includes the combination of anonymized data from different sources to produce new and valuable insights and services. In addition, rules should evolve in a way to fight against “mendacity” and, in contrast, to foster "fact-checking". Also, to promote safeguard situations of illegal transfer of data without notification, for example by the “cloud” service provider without traceability, while promoting the development of interoperability standards so that data is reused across sectors.

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Sample references

Design and Technology in Online Spaces: Health, Work, Education and the Future
Keynote Presentation: Michael Menchaca

Conventional wisdom and popular media typically focus on the more negative facets of the online world: isolation, poor infrastructure, challenges with student learning, and too many Zoom meetings. However, the reality is that online technology has provided an alternate outcome to an even more potentially disastrous reality. This was no accident. Programmers and designers have tinkered for years to create robust online spaces that support health, the workplace, and especially education. The calamitous times of the pandemic only emphasize the utility and necessity of these spaces. In this talk, I will highlight some of the important work supporting the design and implementation of online spaces, including in areas of health, work, and education. I will also briefly talk about what designers envision for the future.

For health, data indicate that distance technology likely saved lives and lowered exposure. I will review some of the important advances in telemedicine and remote learning that allowed for managing risk during the pandemic. In the workforce, beyond just managing exposure, telework has transformed how we work and many companies continue to provide permanent options. Most significantly, in education, exposure to remote teaching has led to purposeful, design-based learning that has transformed learning experiences in all areas: primary, secondary, post-secondary, training, and even informal.

However, each of these areas still faces significant challenges, including patient experiences, working abroad, tax implications, infrastructure, and even global collaboration. But rather than allow such challenges to inhibit progress, we can rely on purposeful design and both fiscal and human investment for success. I will outline some of the major challenges in each of the areas discussed and conclude with a focus on how purposeful design and futurist thinking can help build back better in a post-pandemic future. In short, I will show how we can embrace online spaces and not lament how we have been forced to rely on them.

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Against the Method: Recovering the Senses in the Age of Hyperformatting
Keynote Presentation: Mirian Nogueira Tavares

In 1975 the philosopher of science Paul Feyrebend wrote a work that, even today, provokes reactions: Against the Method. In the first edition, the book contained a subtitle: “Outline of an anarchic theory of the theory of knowledge,” which no longer appears in the 3rd edition revised by the author. In fact, with each new edition, the author revised, added and slightly altered the ideas that were initially shaped and which, according to him, was an incomplete work. Written as a letter to his friend Imre Lakatos, who died before he could give an answer that would also come in book form, Against the Method proposes a counter-method, or an anarchist epistemology, which called into question the positivism of science, and of the Academy, and proposed to restore chaos. A chaos producing divergent thoughts, which approached science as a complex, historical and philosophical whole.

Also, in the ‘70s, Edgar Morin began to write his most monumental work, three volumes which he generically called The Method. In the first volume, The Lost Paradigm: Human Nature, he presents his method, also a counter-method, for the understanding of science, and why not, of the world that formulated it. Complex Thought assumes the etymology of the word Complexus, from Latin – that which is woven together, to affirm that it is not possible to segment knowledge, that it exists in relation.

I intend to approach the question proposed by Feyrebend and, in another way, by Morin, to inquire the direction in which teaching, and the issues related to it, are taking in a contemporaneity too tied to technical thinking and a unidirectional view of scientific knowledge. Will we be able to continue teaching, despite the methods? Is there possible learning that is not measurable and not accounted for?

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